Philly rapper Meek Mill still in jail, but will get new trial

Philadelphia DA says Meek Mill should get a new trial sparking hopes for release

Meek Mill DA Moves to Get Him Outta Jail NOW ... Judge Shuts It Down!!!

Thankfully, the Philadelphia District Attorney's Office just acquiesced to the notion that a retrial would be fair, and should be granted. The DA's office made the statement that Mill should get a new trial during a status hearing on Mill's case.

Meek Mill has been sentenced to three years from prison for a probation violation in November 2017. Mill already served time for the conviction, and is now serving another two to four years in jail on a probation violation.

Philly.com adds that Brinkley planned another hearing for June and "refused to hear arguments from Mill's attorneys that he should be let out on bail".

The Meek Mill incarceration scandal will continue for the time being. The judge - Genece E. Brinkley - did not dismiss Mill's charges during Monday's hearing.

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One of Mill's lawyers, Brian McMonagle, said in court that team would be "filing motions with higher courts Monday seeking to secure Mill's release "immediately". This position was taken due to serious issues regarding the credibility of the arresting officer in the case, Officer Reginald Graham", tweeted Ben Waxman, spokesman for Philly DA Larry Krasner.

"We are thrilled that the District Attorney's office has consented to the PCRA relief which we requested on Meek's behalf", Joe Tacopina, an attorney for Meek Mill, said in a statement emailed to The FADER. The DA also stated in open court that the prior DA was aware that Officer Graham was untrustworthy as far back as 2005, which was never disclosed to Meek's defense team.

Among supporters in the crowd was Mill's 6-year-old son who Fox 29 Philadelphia quoted as saying, "I miss my dad very much".

Meek Mill, whose given name is Robert Rahmeek Williams, is incarcerated in a state prison in Chester, Pa., southwest of Philadelphia. Mill's lawyers argue that the sentence is excessive, part of what they call judge's "personal vendetta".

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