Deaths of famous by their own hands highlight troubling trend

US suicide rate on rise: health agency

New CDC report shows troubling rise in nation's suicide rates

The CDC report on suicide rates appears in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report released Friday.

This week saw the sudden deaths of Bourdain and designer Kate Spade.

In 2016, 745 suicides were reported in Minnesota.

The data also shows that about 22%-24% of people who died by suicide, regardless of whether or not they had a diagnosed mental health condition, disclosed their intent at some point, underscoring the importance of taking such comments seriously.

In just one week two celebrities have committed suicide, Kate Spade and Anthony Bourdain.

She also said new technology provides another way to get help. Twenty-five states experienced a rise in suicides by more than 30 percent, the government report finds.

"We found that many common life stressors were present in the period preceding the suicide, in relationship problems, financial and job issues, physical health concerns", said Dr. Anne Shuchat, deputy director with the Centers for Disease Control.

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According to the report, from 1999 to 2016 suicide rates have increased more than 30 percent in half of our nation's states.

"A celebrity's suicide can create a contagion that we want to be aware of and those individuals who are a risk, who might be connected to that celebrity, we want to reach out to them", Egan said.

Researchers found that over half of the suicide deaths were people who did not have a known mental health condition. Train to become a listener for Caring Contact, where we answer the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. And so, that's one of the things that this study really shows us.

"We learn the signs of stroke and we learn what skin cancer looks like", said Keltz.

He also said it's important to take time for yourself; staying active, eating well and setting aside time to do what you like to do can help with suicidal thoughts. It was lowest in the United States capital, Washington, with 6.9 suicides per 100,000 residents per year.

The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-TALK (8255) or you can visit SuicidePreventionLifeline.org.

The GLS Suicide Prevention Resource Center - which works with colleges and states to design suicide-prevention programs around the country - has remained flat at $5.9 million in funding since 2013, Schumer added.

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